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Pensioner Newsletter

NJMPF PENSIONER NEWSLETTER

Your quarterly news update October – 2021

 

Message from the CEO / Principal Officer Bongi Mkhize

Welcome to the third quarter pensioner newsletter.

Spring has sprung and as the flowers blossom, I hope that this new season will put a proverbial ‘spring’ to your step even amid all that is happening in the world. We all have fought a good fight and endured through it all. In the past couple of months we witnessed a plunge in economic turmoil as we watched from our screens, unrest and looting in Kwa-Zulu-Natal and Gauteng. Yet through it all we soldiered on, we continue to do so as we anticipate tomorrow and wonder if the new normal is on the horizon.


In the last couple of weeks, the Fund has been receiving queries from members regarding the facilitators agreement. Attached to this newsletter is the Fund Insight giving an overview of what the agreement is all about and the opinion of the Fund regarding the agreement. I would like to urge all members to take time to read the agreement carefully and probe it in writing with their respective trade unions.

STAYING CONTACTED DURING A TIME OF SOCIAL DISTANCING

Our members and pensioners are the Fund’s most important stakeholder, providing you with the right level of service is critical to our operations. The COVID-19 pandemic and its subsequent restrictions have certainly posed a challenge is terms of how we continue serving our pensioners, but the Fund rose to the challenge. The Fund is now offering virtual stakeholder engagement programmes, pensioners with valid email addresses are encouraged to submit their details to the Fund’s Client Services department. NJMPF is planning to host a virtual Pensioner Indaba, the Fund relies on pensioners to update their personal details and email addresses for the Indaba to be a success. NJMPF Pensioner Indaba is one of the solutions that the Fund has implemented to serve and stay close to pensioners. Pensioners are also reminded that since the beginning of 2021, they are no longer required to fill in and submit a manual declaration of existence form. The Fund has implemented a new solution for verifying pensioner’s alive status, this new electronically solution ensures that no pension is suspended incorrectly, pensioners are not exposed to contracting Covid-19 while they go to the commissioner to get their declaration of existence form commissioned and they save time and money they would have spent in the process.

UPDATE CONTACT INFORMATION

 

As the NJMPF, we have learnt how important it is to adapt and be flexible so that we can continue to support, educate, and empower our pensioners. Currently, it is vital that we are always able to reach you. You would therefore have received many requests from the Fund throughout the course of this year asking for your missing contact information.


Thank you to everyone who rose to the occasion and helped us update our records accordingly. If you have not yet provided us with all your latest contact details, please do so as soon as possible on 0312795300 or info@njmpf.co.za.

TIPS FOR ADJUSTING TO RETIREMENT

This new phase of your life may be a little difficult to navigate, at first it is true that you thought and dreamt about the day you will retire, to enjoy your golden years. But there’s a good chance you never thought much about the psychological effect it might have on you. Retirement often means a loss of identity. Other issues that accompany retirement – such as more time and less money – can also make for a difficult adjustment. Some retirees experience mental health issues, such as depression and anxiety. If you’re in the early stages of retirement and feeling somehow lost, you’re not alone. Many retirees find the transition to be stressful.


1. EXPECT TO GO THROUGH STAGES OF EMOTIONS


There’s an emotional process that most people go through when adjusting to retirement. At first, there’s a feeling of freedom. It’s like you’re on a vacation that will last forever. That sense of novelty wears off, however, you will settle into a slower lifestyle.


2. STRUCTURE YOUR DAYS


If you enjoy structure, you might establish a routine that helps you plan your days. Experiment with various activities and time slots to see how it makes you feel. Pencil in time for lingering over the newspaper and enjoying a cup of coffee, but add in regular time for exercise, social activities, volunteer opportunities, and family meals. While your days don’t need to be rigid, having a set wake-up time and routine will help you feel more in control of your days.


3. SET SMALL GOALS


Your pre-retirement life was measured in meeting deadlines, finishing projects, or getting a promotion. You can still focus on goals after you retire, though they might be a little different than they were before. Working on goals can give you a sense of purpose and accomplishing new things can give you a sense of achievement. Think about what milestones you might want to reach in the first month, six months, or one year after your retirement and write them down. Do you want to become more active, lose weight, eat healthy foods or start reading more books? Setting goals can be fun.


4. CREATE A NEW BUDGET


Even the savviest of investors might have to make some spending adjustments after retirement. In an ideal world, you should have saved enough to last 20 to 30 years, but if you are the average Joe, there’s a good chance you might not be able to maintain the lifestyle you were accustomed to before retiring. Prioritize what is important to you and what you can do without and then draw-up your budget accordingly. For example, money you previously spent on business clothing can now be cut in half. You might need to add a category for membership fees and/or activity classes and supplies needed for hobbies.


5. ALLOW YOURSELF THE TIME TO ADJUST


You might think that you want to spend your retirement painting, cooking, and reading, but then realise that all the time spent at home doesn’t fulfil the lifestyle you dreamed about. After 30 years in the workplace, you finally have time to experiment with what you really feel passionate about. There are many ways you can spend your time. Fortunately, there’s no need to figure it all out right away. It will likely take a fair amount of experimenting to help you find just the right balance. You can always increase social activities later or develop new hobbies if you want to stay occupied.